The Pharmacist of Film

June 30, 2013
in Category: Articles, Mental Health
0 1699 0

Over 20 years, Bruce Saunders has built Movie Monday into one of Victoria’s most enduringly popular arts events.

 

The police looked uncomfortable the night they came to Movie Monday. We’d just watched Crisis Call, an absorbing, emotional documentary exploring often volatile, sometimes deadly encounters between Canadian police and people with severe mental health problems. After the film, host Bruce Saunders introduced us to two Greater Victoria police officers whom he’d invited to share their perspectives and answer audience questions.

One important point, though, in case you don’t know: The weekly film event Movie Monday takes place in a 100-seat theatre located at Royal Jubilee Hospital’s Eric Martin Pavilion, formerly the psychiatric hospital and today still home to various psychiatric services. Probably at least half the audience that night was comprised of people who had a mental health diagnosis or knew someone who had one, including Saunders himself, diagnosed as bipolar. The ensuing discussion revealed a lot about the challenges faced by all sides, but at times it understandably took provocative, tense turns.

Afterwards, one of the local police officers contacted the Vancouver Island Health Authority to complain that he’d felt “attacked” at the “poorly moderated” event. Rumblings circulated that VIHA might pull the plug on Movie Monday. Saunders anxiously contacted other audience members to write up their own observations of the evening; however, the most important letter came unsolicited: The other local police officer dropped Saunders an email saying he was recommending his department purchase the “excellent” documentary, and adding that he was impressed by Saunders’ “community-minded devotion” and felt “very good” about how “the police perspective was appreciated” by the Movie Monday audience.

“You don’t always have witnesses to your dealings with police,” says the 63-year-old Saunders to me with the kind of light-hearted smile that can only come years after things long since turned out okay. “Luckily for me, there were a lot of witnesses that night.”

Read the rest at Focus online.

Rob Wipond

Thank you for reading.

View my other posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *