Losing Touch with (Community) Reality

June 18, 2012
in Category: Articles, Canadian Politics, Economics, Society
2 2026 0

Why we can no longer really know our own community.

I’d felt compelled to be present, to bear witness to this last stand. That’s why I’d attended a number of meetings alongside representatives from the Capital Regional District, municipalities of Victoria and Saanich, Camosun College, Vancouver Island Health Authority, and others helping bring together a report called Growing Prosperity in the Capital Region.

Drawing on census data from 1996 to 2006, this report was released in April by the Community Social Planning Council. Some interesting insights were included: Poverty in our region remained steady. About 20 percent aged 15-25 were poor. Women, especially women over 75, were amongst the poorest. At least 10 percent of workers lived below the poverty line. It remained difficult to quantify how much the cuts to public services and non-profits, degenerating environmental health, and declining access to land were affecting quality of life.

I was glad that this important information, and these information gaps, were discussed in the report. However, for me, the whole project also carried an air of funereal futility. After the global financial crisis, we all knew this data was gravely dated. Worse, we knew there was no comparable up-to-date data coming, because our federal Conservative government in 2010 decided to make the long-form census voluntary instead of mandatory.

“The census is a vital, even pivotal component of our statistical infrastructure,” UBC economists David Green and Kevin Milligan wrote in Canadian Public Policy. Comparing the Conservative’s decision to abandoning upkeep on our power grids and roads, they wrote, “the degradation of the Canadian census has impacts that, while perhaps not immediately clear to Canadians, will eventually have large influences on the quality of Canadian society.”

Unfortunately, it already is becoming clear—through the immeasurable despair that’s seeping into communities and groups like ours across the country, while any still-thrashing protesters are buried like “old news.”

Read the rest at Focus online.

Rob Wipond

Thank you for reading.

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2 comments

  1. set

    What sense of community can one have if they look for answers within Government ?

    This is a false premise/supposition.

    Capital Regional District, municipalities of Victoria and Saanich, Camosun College, Vancouver Island Health Authority, and others helping bring together a report called Growing Prosperity in the Capital Region.

    These groups are the problem, I suggest that your thinking has already been co-opted by a false premise.

  2. Rob Wipond (author)

    Hi Set,
    This article isn’t about looking to those organizations for a sense of community. That’s not the premise of the article, nor a supposition I make. This article is about the way in which census data can be used to, in some ways, help us understand aspects of our community.
    Rob

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